Tuesday, April 27, 2010

2 Kings 3

5 comments:

Prairie Chick said...

Not sure what to make of this. Contemplating Elisha's initial response (I wouldn't touch this with a ten foot pole response), and his subsequent giving in. No clarity of thought right now but will continue to ponder.

Jude said...

It is interesting that the presence of one righteous man, Jehoshaphat, would cause Elisha to have mercy upon the king of Israel and Edom. It is also interesting that God was willing to bail them out when they had gone ahead with a plan that was not brought about through consultation with God.

Mac an Rothaich said...

Liked that Elisha asked for music while he waited on the word from God. Often music can help me gather my self into a calm place so the Lord can speak to me and I can hear.

Also thought it was cool that the Lord only took notice of it all because of Jehoshaphat. I suppose we all rush a head now and then, I know we do and thankfully the Lord loves us as he did Jehoshaphat and will show mercy.

I shared with my man about how the end of the battle really bothered me. The king sacrafising his son and then 'great wrath came upon Israel, so they withdrew from him and returned to their own land.' We discussed how it is a clear example that the enemy really is spiritual powers and will fight us. We discussed weither that part happened because the army ran ahead of God and perhaps he spared them but didn't give them complete victory because there was a lack of putting leadership in the hands of God.

I didn't remember reading this part before and felt it was pretty upsetting so was wondering what you ladies thought...

phew... excuse me I am a bit shook up, just had JW's stop by and had to quickly turn them away. They often upset me because my Dad came out of that...

Jude said...

I agree--the Moabite king sacrificing his son is horrible and that it would be seen to help their cause is also horrifying. My study bible says this about the "fury against Israel" and their withdrawal.

"The Hebrew underlying this clause would normally refer to a visitation of God's wrath. It may be that just when total victory appeared to be in Israel's grasp, God's displeasure with the Ahab dynasty showed in some way that caused the Israelite kings to give up the campaign. Comparing the Aramaic and later Hebrew usage, a few scholars suggest that the Hebrew here can be translated , "There was great dismay upon/in Israel."

Prairie Chick said...

great to glean from your ladies thoughts, have to admit, I drew a blank on this one.